• Open Noon-Late Daily
  • All Ages Admitted Until 4:30PM
  • 21+ & I.D. Required After 5PM

Video Goodness

Welcome to the main event: Over 90 of the best arcade games from the past four decades, all in an authentic gameroom environment. Original cabinets, original gameplay and original quarter slots, just like you remember! Pull on some Pumas and terrycloth wristbands, get in your stance, and prepare to immerse yourself in the electric glow of years gone by.

  • #
  • 1943 (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    1943

    (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Capcom
    Release Date: 1984
  • A
  • Aliens

    Aliens

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1990
    It’s the year 2179 and Lieutenant Ellen Ripley has been discovered nearly 60 years after surviving her first encounter with the Xenomorphs. Hadley’s Hope, a terraforming and research colony on planet LV-426, has gone silent. Now you must take on the role of Ellen Ripley or Corporal Dwayne Hicks to investigate the colony, eliminate the alien invasion, and rescue anyone that’s left!

    Drop in to LV-426 armed only with a M56 Smartgun and your wits, as you search the colony for signs of life. Hold the fire button down for a continuous stream of bullets, and use the second fire button to crouch and shoot (crucial for those pesky facehuggers, and Xenomorphs coming at you from the ground). Look out for upgraded weapons like flamethrowers and enemy-seeking rocket launchers, especially helpful when you’re surrounded by bugs. Pressing both attack buttons will throw a bomb (if you have any left!), but the real heavy-duty hardware is the power loader: Take your level 6 rating and use the mechanized suit to smash through enemies and bay doors without breaking a sweat! Each level has some variety, too - you’ll crawl through ducts (pay attention to your tracker so you don’t get ambushed), ride freight elevators, and face boss characters in a pseudo-3D perspective similar to the base levels in Contra.
  • Aliens: Extermination

    Aliens: Extermination

    Manufacturer: Global VR
    Release Date: 2006
    Return to LV-426 to eradicate the last of the Xenomorphs! You’re a Colonial Marine tasked with cleanup of the remnants of Hadley’s Hope, the failed Weyland-Yutani colony. However, it looks like acid-bleeding aliens aren’t your only problem: Weyland-Yutani’s defense systems have been doing a little bit of work of their own…

    In Aliens: Extermination you only need to know one thing: where they are! Aim your light gun at oncoming enemies in this fast-paced first-person action game, and pull the trigger to eliminate enemies before they overwhelm you. Keep an eye on the ammo indicator either on-screen or on your gun, as your fire rate will drop dramatically when you need to reload (by shooting spinning ammo power-ups). Toss a grenade by hitting the glowing red button on the side of your weapon, and if you’re lucky enough to find a napalm container, hold down the yellow button near the front of the weapon to unleash a stream of fire and burn the bugs! In case you’ve forgotten, you’ll quickly be reminded that Xenomorphs are avid climbers, and they’ll come at you from all angles. Watch for plenty of secret items hidden in destructible objects, but be wary of friendly fire - hit an ally, and you’ll be penalized! (Why did you have to stand right next to that Alien, anyway?!?)
  • Area 51 (in "Area 51/Maximum Force" cabinet)

    Area 51

    (in "Area 51/Maximum Force" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1998
    Set in Nevada's infamous Area 51, this game takes place during an alien invasion centered at the site. You and your peers in the military group STAAR must stop this invasion at any cost. The game plays like a standard light shooter, and features lots of extras, like hidden doors that unlock extra rooms where you can recieve power-ups and play skill building games. To get to these doorways, you have to perform certain tasks like shooting out a certain window or finding secret ladders and entryways. These will lead you to the bonus area's, like the bizzare "shake your Buddah" level, where you take pot shots at the development team to increase your characters skills. The game starts with battles in the hangars of Area 51, and moves through the site until you end up in a series of caves at the end of the game for a final showdown with the aliens and thier zombie counterparts.
  • Asteroids

    Asteroids

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1979
  • B
  • Bubble Bobble

    Bubble Bobble

    Manufacturer: Taito
    Release Date: 1986
  • Burgertime

    Burgertime

    Manufacturer: Bally/Midway
    Release Date: 1982
  • Bust-A-Move

    Bust-A-Move

    Manufacturer: Taito
    Release Date: 1994
    Bub and Bob from the arcade classic Bubble Bobble take their bubble-bursting action to a new game with Bust-A-Move, the 1994 puzzle game from Taito that kicked off a successful series. The game play is simple: Bub and Bob are at the bottom of a playfield full of colored bubbles with a cannon. Clear the playfield by strategically shooting bubbles to match colors. Attach three or more colored bubbles and they’ll pop, taking all of the bubbles hanging from them along. As the level progresses, the ceiling lowers, heightening the pressure to make the right shots. Let the playfield overfill with bubbles and it’s game over! Don’t think for too long, either – the game will automatically shoot the next bubble if you don’t make a decision quickly enough. Bust-A-Move’s addictive gameplay led to several sequels and spin-offs, and the original still holds up. Don’t just stand there – Bust-A-Move!
  • C
  • Centipede

    Centipede

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1980
    Known for its distinctive pastel graphics, its turbulent soundscape, and the top-notch side art, Centipede is a well-known classic for good reason, and deserves every bit of its enduring fame. The action starts slowly with a long centipede descending down the vertical playfield. Any time it hits one of the many mushrooms scattered about it, it turns around and continues towards the player, who is shooting up from the bottom of the screen. The centipede splits when fired upon, and each segment destroyed adds more mushrooms to the playfield, further complicating matters. Additional flea and spider enemies take aim on the player, who must employ speed and accuracy to last any amount of time in the increasingly fast levels. It’s worth noting that Centipede was co-developed by Dona Bailey, who was the only female software engineer at Atari at the time. The pastel and flowery scheme was a deliberate attempt to create a female audience for the game, which did work, and it was rather popular with both sexes at the time. The aforementioned side art is truly some of the best in arcade history; colorful, epic and just the right amount of garish. Centipede is every bit the arcade classic it deserves to be, and an excellent example of a well-designed trackball game.
  • Championship Sprint

    Championship Sprint

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1986
  • Cruis’n Exotica

    Cruis’n Exotica

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1999
  • D
  • Dance Dance Revolution Extreme

    Dance Dance Revolution Extreme

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1999
  • Dig Dug

    Dig Dug

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1982
  • Donkey Kong

    Donkey Kong

    Manufacturer: Nintendo
    Release Date: 1981
  • Dragon Blaze (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    Dragon Blaze

    (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Psikyo
    Release Date: 2000
  • Dragon's Lair

    Dragon's Lair

    Manufacturer: Cinematronics
    Release Date: 1983
    Dragon’s Lair is an essential piece of arcade history, and a fond memory for anyone who ever played it. The classic adventure sees players in control of Dirk the Daring, a chivalrous knight who always appears to have a bit of a headache. Using the single joystick and attack button, players take visual cues and time their moves just right to keep Dirk on the correct path, away from countless dangers. There is some amount of memorization involved, but being able to run through Dragon’s Lair without dying is a certain distinction few players can honestly brag about. The Don Bluth Company is responsible for much of the game’s existence, and supplied all of the animation. Other great efforts from that company include the films "The Land Before Time" and "An American Tail". That distinctive animation style is on full display here, with a fun, personality-filled medieval theme. Whether you’re re-living precious Dragon’s Lair memories or stepping into Dirk’s shoes for the first time, this is an important and FUN title that is not to be missed, should you get the rare opportunity to play one!
  • F
  • Frogger

    Frogger

    Manufacturer: Sega/Gremlin
    Release Date: 1981
  • G
  • Galaga

    Galaga

    Manufacturer: Namco
    Release Date: 1981
  • J
  • Joust

    Joust

    Manufacturer: Williams
    Release Date: 1982
  • K
  • Killer Queen

    Killer Queen

    Manufacturer: Josh DeBonis and Nik Mikros
    Release Date: 2014
    The world’s only 10-player arcade strategy game! Two teams, each led by a powerful Queen, face off to be the first to bring the giant snail god home, fill their hive with nectar, or execute a triple assassination of the enemy Queen.
  • M
  • Mario Bros.

    Mario Bros.

    Manufacturer: Nintendo
    Release Date: 1983
  • Mario Kart Arcade GP 2

    Mario Kart Arcade GP 2

    Manufacturer: Nintendo
    Release Date: 2008
    It’s a natural fit for the exciting races of Mario Kart to end up in the arcade. Mario Kart game play makes so much sense for the arcade; it’s a wonder why we didn’t see a sit down version sooner! In any case, when Namco Bandai and Nintendo finally teamed up to release a Mario Kart game for the arcades, it immediately became one of the best racers to hit the scene. While folks are familiar with Nintendo’s kart racing series on home consoles, the action translates perfectly to a competitive, immersive and most of all fun racing experience in the arcade! Players choose from 13 racers, which include a lot of the classic Nintendo characters and also a few from Namco’s stable, like Ms. Pac-Man and Blinky the ghost. Each track has several power-ups scattered throughout the level, with varying effects. Boost your speed with a Dash Mushroom or a Thunder Cloud (but be careful to pass it on before lightning strikes!), strike your opponents with a Green Shell or a Needle Bomb, or trip them up with a Banana Peel! And if you’re lucky enough to find a Star, it’s easy riding while you’re invulnerable to any attack. The player can also take their picture with Mario Kart GP 2’s on-board camera, and display it onscreen while racing! The classic Mario Kart game play is intact here, with the heavy item use and course interaction. Each of the game’s 16 racetracks is a colorful, themed experience, showcasing myriad Mario locations. Some of the favorites return such as a Boo’s Mansion course, WaLuigi Stadium, and the dreaded Rainbow Road. Each level is accompanied by commentary relevant to the action, which simulates a live broadcast of the race. This is the second edition of an arcade Mario Kart racer and only improved on the first! Sitting down with a friend to compete in tried-and-true kart racing is an awesome arcade experience, and not one to be missed!
  • Maximum Force (in "Area 51/Maximum Force" cabinet)

    Maximum Force

    (in "Area 51/Maximum Force" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1997
    Maximum Force was released in 1997 and features a picture-perfect B-movie action theme and was a successful follow-up to Area 51. Grab a light gun and take on waves of terrorists! Packed with Easter eggs, there are several of them in each of the game’s three vast levels, giving you a reason to do more than just dispense justice!
  • Metal Slug

    Metal Slug

    Manufacturer: SNK
    Release Date: 1996
    Players run and gun through a classic jungle war setting, rescuing POWs and upgrading weapons along the way. The ability to jump in a tank (the titular Metal Slug) is an awesome addition to the action!
  • Metal Slug 3 (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Metal Slug 3

    (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: SNK
    Release Date: 2000
    The military from the original Metal Slug and the martians from the 2nd team up for another wacky installment, this one a true favorite among fans. Introduced here are a host of new vehicles, some updated weapons, and a system of branching paths that really adds to the replay value. Each path has its own difficulty level, and coming back to try them all is a great way to take on the variety found in Metal Slug 3.
  • Metal Slug 5 (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Metal Slug 5

    (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: SNK
    Release Date: 2003
    Metal Slug 5 pits the heroes against the Ptolemaic Army, who have stolen a disc containing secrets of the Metal Slug project. You can take them on with three new vehicles, including the Slug Gunner, a mech-like vehicle that can even punch enemies in close-combat or transform into a tank! The tone of Metal Slug 5 is less humorous than the rest of the series, with an emphasis on challenging gameplay. But don't worry - even when you're facing a steady stream of bullets, try the new slide-dash maneuver, allowing you to travel under many projectiles while shooting in a move that would make John Woo proud.
  • Metal Slug X (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Metal Slug X

    (in "Metal Slug" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: SNK
    Release Date: 1999
    Metal Slug 2 was a good game, but far from perfect, suffering from some slowdown issues (that admittedly can give you a chance to breathe while the screen is full of enemies and action). Metal Slug X is a remake of 2 that fixed these problems, and upgraded that good title into a truly great one. Here, we're introduced to a science-fiction influenced theme, along with a few new weapon upgrades and a ramped-up difficulty. Also introduced in this title are special status effects a player can be afflicted with – certain items will afflict the player with the detrimental “mummy” or “fat” modes!
  • Millipede

    Millipede

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1982
    In a forest faraway, only you can stop the insect invaders. The King is dead and his vengeful spirit has summoned an army of bugs to destroy your kingdom. You, the Archer, must pick up your bow, head out to the mushroom garden and battle the horde of monstrous pests, including the almighty Millipede!

    Millipede is the follow-up to Atari’s wildly successful Centipede (1980). Employing similar graphics and gameplay as its predecessor, Millipede is noted for being the far more difficult of the two games. One-or-two players use Atari’s fundamental Trak-Ball to control the Archer at the bottom of the screen. A single fire button is used to shoot the Archer’s ammo toward the approaching Millipede and its posse of bugs. Careful! One enemy strike and the Archer loses a life. Players must avoid and destroy all segments of the Millipede and other enemies in order to score as many points as possible!
  • Mortal Kombat II

    Mortal Kombat II

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1993
  • Ms. Pac-Man

    Ms. Pac-Man

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1981
  • Ms. Pac-Man

    Ms. Pac-Man

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1981
  • N
  • NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC (in "Sport Station: NFL Blitz 2000 Gold & NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC" cabinet)

    NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC

    (in "Sport Station: NFL Blitz 2000 Gold & NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1999
    The smash arcade basketball series NBA Jam eventually became NBA Hangtime and finally NBA Showtime, which is noteworthy for its NBC branding and its addition of 3D graphics. Showtime is essentially the same kind of game as the original Jam, with a few minor tweaks. A basic foul system was introduced for Showtime that includes a free throw penalty opportunity. Each team has an expanded roster, with several NBA greats to choose from at both the start and the halftime of each game!
  • NFL Blitz ‘99

    NFL Blitz ‘99

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1998
  • NFL Blitz 2000 Gold (in "Sport Station: NFL Blitz 2000 Gold & NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC" cabinet)

    NFL Blitz 2000 Gold

    (in "Sport Station: NFL Blitz 2000 Gold & NBA ShowTime: NBA on NBC" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1999
    NFL Blitz 2000 Gold was the last version of Blitz to get a proper arcade release. This means that all of the additional secrets, tricks and animations from the series made it in to this fully updated and refined version of the game. The rowdy and stripped down football rules are in full effect here, for the best Blitz experience available in the arcade!
  • P
  • Pac-Man Battle Royale

    Pac-Man Battle Royale

    Manufacturer: Namco
    Release Date: 2010
  • Paperboy

    Paperboy

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1984
  • PlayChoice-10

    PlayChoice-10

    Manufacturer: Nintendo
    Release Date: 1986
  • Point Blank

    Point Blank

    Manufacturer: Namco
    Release Date: 1994
    Point Blank is a different kind of gun game: It’s silly, colorful, inventive and unique! Instead of a cops-and-robbers or zombies-must-die bloodbath, Point Blank employs a wide variety of mini games that genuinely require some dedicated sharpshooting. The game moves quickly, and one or two players get a lot of different goals, rules and targets to blast in a frenzy of creative action. Game modes include accuracy duels, hair-trigger speed shooting, memory challenges and more. Point Blank thrives on variation, and no two games are exactly alike! All of this adds up to a shooting experience that is wildly entertaining, rather competitive, and refreshingly simple. Despite its simple appearance, Point Blank is nothing if not challenging, and it takes a while of playing seriously to get good at it. It’s a rewarding challenge, with a carnival of gunplay that's worth every credit!
  • Q
  • Q*bert

    Q*bert

    Manufacturer: Gottlieb
    Release Date: 1982
  • R
  • Raiden II

    Raiden II

    Manufacturer: Seibu Kaihatsu/Fabtek
    Release Date: 1993
  • Rampage World Tour

    Rampage World Tour

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1997
  • RoadBlasters

    RoadBlasters

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1987
    Drive to survive and blast away anything in your path with Atari Games' 1987 combat racer, RoadBlasters! You're a nameless road warrior piloting a futuristic vehicle, competing in a life-or-death race across the vast reaches of the post-apocalypse. Put your foot to the floor and your finger on the trigger, because your opponents don't just want to cross the finish line - they want to finish you, too! Can you steer your way to victory in the ultimate race, or will you end up in the rear view mirror? Cruise down to Ground Kontrol and find out!
  • Robotron: 2084

    Robotron: 2084

    Manufacturer: Williams
    Release Date: 1982
  • S
  • Simpsons, The

    Simpsons, The

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1991
  • Smash TV

    Smash TV

    Manufacturer: Williams
    Release Date: 1990
  • Star Wars

    Star Wars

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1983
  • Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting

    Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting

    Manufacturer: Capcom
    Release Date: 1992
    The biggest fighting game franchise ever, Street Fighter, picks up the pace with Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting. Choose from twelve unique challengers and take a trip around the world with one ultimate goal: Conquer the World Warrior tournament! Those familiar with Street Fighter II and the follow-up Street Fighter II: Champion Edition will feel immediately at home here, as SF2 Turbo is really just an official souped-up SF2: CE. This particular entry’s primary innovation is just cranking up the speed, so quick reflexes and precise timing are even more essential whether you’re taking on the single-player campaign or going head-to-head with an arcade rival. Twenty-plus years later, Street Fighter is still the king, and Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting is still one of the best fighting games of all-time!
  • Street Fighter III: Third Strike

    Street Fighter III: Third Strike

    Manufacturer: Capcom
    Release Date: 1999
  • Strikers 1945 (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    Strikers 1945

    (in "Trigger Zone" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Psikyo
    Release Date: 1995
  • Sunset Riders

    Sunset Riders

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1991
  • T
  • Target Terror Gold

    Target Terror Gold

    Manufacturer: Raw Thrills
    Release Date: 2004
    Target: Terror is an on-rails shooter that incorporates full motion video as it leads players through 10 anti-terrorist missions. The game can be played by one or two players. Players use a myriad of standard-to-wacky weapons to fight their way to the final level; a hijacked airliner headed for Washington, DC.

    The upgraded Gold edition of this game was released later in 2004. This edition included new bonus mini-games, combat medals and top-secret areas. One such bonus area puts the player in a grassy field where they have to shoot at the bomb-strapped turkeys being thrown their way.
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day

    Terminator 2: Judgment Day

    Manufacturer: Midway
    Release Date: 1991
    There’s a lot to like in this awesome cabinet for both fans of Terminator 2 the film, and gun games in general. The action here is fully automatic, and the two simultaneous players yield twin uzis at the recessed screen. Wave after wave of skeletal terminators come at the players, and are best taken out with a rewardingly effective headshot. The uzi weapons do overheat, though – so keep an eye on the powerups scattered throughout. These include the coolant to keep your gun operating, shotgun shells, grenade launchers, and various weapon upgrades. The Terminator 2 arcade game is a great throwback to when that film caused a big splash in not just the theater, but the arcade and the home console scene as well.
  • Tetris (in "Tetris Multigame 2" cabinet)

    Tetris

    (in "Tetris Multigame 2" cabinet)

    Manufacturer: Atari Games
    Release Date: 1988
  • Tetris: The Grand Master 3 - Terror-Instinct

    Tetris: The Grand Master 3 - Terror-Instinct

    Manufacturer: Taito
    Release Date: 2005
    The inexplicably titled Tetris Grandmaster 3: Terror-Instinct is the latest in a series of Japanese tournament style Tetris arcade games. While there are many modern iterations of Tetris in play today, the Grandmaster series takes the competitive aspect to a whole new level, and commands the true skill of a high level twitch player. The result is an incredibly fast, hyped up Tetris game with the blazing speed and high skills found in the Japanese arcade scene. It doesn’t take long to get used to this new, crazy fast type of Tetris, and suddenly your old school game will feel antiquated and slow. That’s a good thing though, as a good round of Tetris Grandmaster is a rush intense enough to make this classic feel like a whole new game!
  • The Empire Strikes Back

    The Empire Strikes Back

    Manufacturer: Atari
    Release Date: 1985
    Take on some of the most iconic and exciting battles from the most popular Star Wars movie ever in Atari's arcade adaptation of The Empire Strikes Back! Luke Skywalker and the Rebel Alliance have destroyed the Death Star and dealt a major blow to Darth Vader's evil Empire in the original Star Wars, and the heroes regroup while Vader is in pursuit. Join the Battle of Hoth and take down AT-ATs, defend the Rebel base and escape through an asteroid field! The Empire Strikes Back is a must-play not only for Star Wars fans, but fans of fast-paced arcade shooters. The intuitive controls, simple goals, great graphics and sound let you get right to the action and become the hero the galaxy needs. Conquer Vader with only a quarter, and may the Force be with you always!
  • Time Crisis II

    Time Crisis II

    Manufacturer: Namco
    Release Date: 1997
    Namco broke ground and really innovated with the original Time Crisis. Though there have been gun games as long as there have been arcades, the ideas in Time Crisis really introduced some new, entertaining elements to just plain shooting at stuff. As implied in the name, the player is under a bit of time constraint, as a countdown timer makes everything a hurry. More time can be earned by clearing checkpoints and accomplishing missions quickly. But the real trademark to Time Crisis gameplay is the foot pedal at the base of the cabinet. With it, players can duck behind cover or hide behind corners to avoid enemy fire, choosing when to jump out and shoot. Time Crisis II introduced two player game play, with a cooperative mode so friends can enjoy the bullet-ridden mayhem! The aesthetic of the Time Crisis series is notoriously cheesy, but embraced among fans. The action movie tropes at play here are quite deliberate, and well-suited to the theme. Time Crisis II sees a pair of secret agents firing away in an effort to stop an evil corporation from launching a military satellite. For an action game, it’s rather plot heavy, and the players are treated to cinematic cutscenes and rough dialogue. Time Crisis II is one of the best arcade shooters ever released, and we’re proud to finally add this massive cabinet to our lineup. Take a break and play it today, and bring a friend – with two players, it’s even better!
  • TMNT: Turtles In Time

    TMNT: Turtles In Time

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1991
  • X
  • X-Men (6 Players)

    X-Men (6 Players)

    Manufacturer: Konami
    Release Date: 1992

Pinball Badness

Behold the largest and best-maintained public pinball gameroom in the Pacific Northwest!

  • A
  • AC⚡DC (Stern , 2012)
    A good band-based pinball table needs to be fully equipped with that group's music, and AC/DC fits the bill, complete with twelve songs from the band's vast library of hits. Make no mistake, with its awesome sound, fiery visuals and pro-designed gameplay, this table rocks about as hard as our Australian friends themselves.

    From Steve Richie, classic pinball designer responsible for some of the best tables out there, this playfield is built for speed. Each shot is carefully arranged with accuracy in mind with a ruleset that rewards skill while staying interesting for casual players as well. Among the entertaining toys here are a rotating cannon that the player utilizes in For Those About to Rock mode, and a bell - naturally - for Hell's Bells mode. The cannon is controlled with a fire button right on the lock bar, for a little added variety.

    Everything about AC/DC contributes to a sensory overload, with an attention to detail that is sure to please fans of the band. All through the art, game modes, and objectives, clever easter eggs and references to AC/DC can be found. Like many games where the player selects a mode, each of the twelve songs brings a different and challenging ruleset. There are three main multiball modes, and reaching at least one per game is simple enough. These three multiball modes can be stacked as well, for some giant scoring opportunities.

    It's a long way to the top if you wanna multiball, and the high voltage action found in this table will leave anyone looking for some good pinball absolutely thunderstruck!
  • Addams Family, The (Bally , 1992)
    The #1 selling pinball game of all time! Explore the Addams family mansion and raid treasure from the vault. Thing “lends a hand”, picking up the ball and flipping flippers for you! Special Collector's Edition adds prizes from Cousin It's Hideout.
  • Attack From Mars (Midway , 1995)
    Meet pinball's answer to those campy, broccoli-headed aliens that invaded Earth in pulp comics and toys of the 1950s. Shoot the flashing, 'spinning' saucer and bouncing, rubbery-armed Martians to save the countries of the world, then mount a counterattack on Mars itself!
  • B
  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Williams , 1993)
    Francis Ford Coppola’s early 90’s Dracula film tried more than a lot of previous cinematic efforts to really stick to the book. As such, it is a wholly dark, violent, eerie and tragic film. More than a lot of pinball tables, Dracula really captures this essence, and is a great example of just how moody a pinball experience can be. While truly one of the stranger, more morbid tables one can play, it is more than just mood, and is full of special, original and satisfying pinball content! For one, all three of the multiball modes can be triggered simultaneously. This leads to an absolute scoring blitz, as all of the jackpots are lit and stackable! Doing this takes a bit of planning, and a deliberate effort to light the correct spots before triggering mulitball, but the end result is well worth it, and it is actually quite possible to pull off. The eerie Mist Multiball definitely deserves mention, as a ball glides across the playfield by itself, guided by some unseen hand. Knocking this ball from its spectral trail with one of your own triggers the scoring mode, and you get to keep the haunted one in play. A particularly fun video mode is also present here, with the player using the left and right flippers to shoot waves of attacking wolves. Brimming with movie-accurate sound, haunting music, and dementedly atmospheric gameplay, Dracula is a gem in the already strong Williams lineup. Just be happy you get to play it in a nice loud arcade - playing this one alone in a basement could get pretty dark!
  • C
  • Cirqus Voltaire (Bally/Midway , 1997)
    Marvel at the mystery of Cirqus Voltaire! Brilliant colors, lively gameplay and innovative features are the hallmarks of this late-model Williams pin. Battle the crazed ringmaster as he pops up from the playfield and captures your ball, balancing it precariously on his head! Cannon fire, a disappearing "boom balloon" bumper and death-defying high wire balancing acts all await you. WIth six different multi-ball modes, there's always something new to discover under the big top!
  • D
  • Doctor Who (Bally , 1990)
    The seven Doctors are fleeing from the relentless Daleks, and only you can rescue them! Hit the "Time Expander" to raise it out of the playfield one level, then another(!), and complete the targets inside to enter the Time Expansion and banish the Daleks and their evil leader Davros once and for all.

    Listen to the memorable original theme music and quotes from the good Doctors as you play. Artwork includes famous scenes from the series and a talking, flashing Dalek perched atop the backbox.
  • I
  • Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure (Williams , 1993)
    Williams really hit their stride in 1993 with the Super*Pin family of tables, regarded as some of pinball’s all time greatest. Among them: Twilight Zone, Star Trek: The Next Generation and this particular gem, Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure. Like its other Super*Pin brethren, Indiana Jones features a widebody playfield. Taking full advantage of the rich Indiana Jones license, designers Mark Richie (Fish Tales) and Brian Eddy (Attack From Mars) put together a deep game with plenty to see and do!

    Based on the first three Indiana Jones films, Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure is packed with plenty of nods to the series' most memorable moments. There are four multiball modes, two of which pile on a frantic six ball bash! The table features include the love-it-or-hate-it “Path of Adventure,” which is a separate playfield that the player must tilt as the ball falls through, avoiding holes in the playfield floor. It’s not unlike the old “labyrinth” wooden box toys, just simplified for a pinball playfield. The classic Indiana Jones score is the main soundtrack for the game, but there are plenty of music cues and sound clips to accompany the several varied modes of gameplay. Giving the sound some extra oomph is Williams' DCS sound system, introduced with this game and later utilized for most of their titles through the 90s, including video games. DCS (short for "Digital Compression System") allowed for higher-quality and more dynamic sound, with multiple channels allowing music, speech and sound effects to be mixed during the game. Whether you're energized by the trademark Indiana Jones fanfare or quoting along with one of the many lines lifted straight from the original film trilogy, you'll be more immersed in the action!

    This game is truly a fine discovery, and a treasure among pinball classics. When it comes to pinball, you must choose, but choose wisely and go for Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure!
  • J
  • Judge Dredd (Bally , 1993)
    You are the law! Bally’s 1993 pinball Judge Dredd dares you to brave the most dangerous city ever: Mega-City One, teeming with criminals, crooks, and all types of creeps! Only one man can keep the peace: Judge Dredd! Pursue perpetrators, take down a murderous sniper, destroy a battle tank or jail someone for bad gas – the action is fast, frenetic and often hilarious! Based on the original 2000 AD comic (and not the Sly Stallone film adaptation), Judge Dredd keeps the same bizarre, dark humor of the source material and pulls no punishment. Want to skip to multiball? Drop an extra credit to activate “SuperGame”, an instant 2-ball multiball with 4 unique modes: Mad Bomber, Deadworld Attack, Traffic Jam and Prison Break. Each mode has its own objectives, and if you’re quick to light the J-U-D-G-E targets, you’ll start a 6-ball frenzy multiball! Your mission to protect and serve pinball doesn’t end there, though: Advance crime levels for your chance at a 100-million point shot! Judge Dredd is a fantastically detailed widebody “SuperPin” table released the same year as other classic widebody games like The Twilight Zone, Star Trek: Next Generation and Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure, to name a few. If you’re a fan of those games, you’ll love Judge Dredd’s unique style. Sentence yourself to an evening of fantastic pinball: Play Judge Dredd today!
  • K
  • KISS (Stern , 2015)
    Few rock bands have one pinball table, let alone two, but KISS are legends. Their original table was released by the Bally company in 1978, during the glory days of KISS original run. Now, as the legacy of KISS continues over 4 decades later, Stern brings us a new table with plenty of nods to the original and tons of content for members of the KISS army.

    Stern implemented this table on their new "Spike" pinball platform, meant to increase reliability and ease integration of new technology. The main improvements to this new build include a great upgrade to the audio, which KISS naturally utilizes. Ten of best KISS cuts are played in their entirety throughout the game, and the player chooses a favorite at the start. Right away you'll notice the giant Gene Simmons head perched prominently next to the right ramp, replete with his grotesquely outstretched tongue. There's also a smaller Paul Stanley figure above the left portion of the table. Players spell K-I-S-S, light Demon, Starchild, Spaceman and Catman targets, and bring on the 4-ball Demon Multiball.

    Gene and Paul provided original voice work for this table, announcing the action, though most of the sound throughout the game is KISS music. Fans of truly vintage pinball will recognize the four pop bumpers as the same ones from the original Bally table. This new edition also includes a Colossal Bonus multiplier, like the original.

    With all the features one would expect from a KISS pinball table and the signature gameplay of a modern Stern, the new KISS pinball is a great addition to the long-running dynasties of both this classic rock band and the production company that made it. Casual fans will have a blast, and hardcore devotees will want to rock 'n roll all night long!
  • L
  • Lord Of The Rings (Stern , 2003)
    As complex as the book, as fastpaced as the video game, and as pretty as the movie, Lord of the Rings pinball will become your favorite new game before you know it! Win the rings of Dwarves, Elves, and Men, forge The One Ring, then play all three movie multiball modes to destroy it. Playfield includes a giant Balrog guarding the pass to the One ring, intricate towers you can knock down with skillful shots, and over a dozen die-cast miniatures of the heroes and villains of Middle Earth.
  • M
  • Metallica (Stern , 2012)
    As fans of both heavy metal and pinball know, the wait for an actual metal-themed table has been far too long. While the hard rock of AC/DC, KISS and Guns N Roses provided some great pinball times, the Bay Area thrash found on Metallica's first few albums is easily the heaviest, most metal music to ever grace a pinball machine.

    Metallica pinball is more than just twelve awesome songs in gameplay mode, however. Every bit of attention has been paid to present the complex aesthetic of one of rock's biggest and best bands. Spanning their entire catalog, but with a focus on the fan-favorite earlier work, Metallica is a table that absolutely shreds.

    Right away one will notice the colorfully distinctive backglass art, done by none other than Dirty Donny, whose collaborations with the world of metal, punk, skating and pinball are countless. This irreverent look is found on the playfield as well, providing visuals dynamic enough to match Metallica's studio recordings heard throughout. Designer John Borg, who also did the Guns N Roses table, did an excellent job of making the whole experience feel like an authentic heavy metal rager.

    The ruleset is fairly simple, with each of the modes interacting with the several toys on the playfield. The Grave Marker, Snake, Coffin and Electric Chair multiball modes are all started with clean shots to each of the aforementioned toys. Hitting each of the FUEL targets will start Fuel mode, and spelling METALLICA will start the Justice Mode. All & all, Metallica is pretty straightforward, with a focus on action, high speed multiballs and, of course, the music.

    It's hard to top a good loud game of Metallica for a pinball experience that really captures its subject. From the constant references to the albums to the persistently action packed playfield, this table is a genuinely fun one, and a true success as a recent Stern.
  • N
  • No Good Gofers (Williams , 1997)
    Golf and pinball have a lot in common if you think about it. In both games, the player tries over and over to perfect precise shots, balancing frustration and glory in a contest of man vs. gravity. While golf is played on a sprawling outdoor course, and pinball is always played indoors, both hobbies are habit forming, social, and can take years to perfect. No Good Gofers is a particularly entertaining pinball table with a fully-realized golf theme, even though it borrows more from Caddyshack than the PGA Tour. The yuks are constant in this silly, irreverent table, but the gameplay is genuine and rewarding! In No Good Gofers, the majority of the player’s efforts will be to advance holes of golf played in-game. This is accomplished by completing a few flashing “drive” shots, then sending the ball to the wide putting range zone. The main objective here isn’t terribly difficult, but playing through nine holes with a host of other modes and objectives can be a very rich round of pinball. Bud and Buzz, the loudmouthed “gofers” seen on the colorful backglass, serve as the stars of the game. The player hits their pop-up targets to lock and start multiball, and often to just silence their constant taunting. Several times throughout a game, the player will get brief chances to shoot the elusive Hole in One shot. For this, a special ramp lowers directly on to the center of the playfield, setting up a crucial shot to an upper ramp. Big points and game advancement reward this tricky, satisfying bull’s-eye! No Good Gofers is light, unintimidating, and silly enough for just about anyone to play, but also a deep, objective-oriented game that will please the most discerning pinheads. Tee up with your favorite beverage and try it today!
  • P
  • Pirates of the Caribbean (Stern , 2006)
    A fan favorite based on the hit Disney franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean pulls elements from the first two "Pirates" films for a swashbuckling good time! Designer Dennis Nordman (Elvira Scared Stiff) created this inspired silverball journey through the seven seas, with a moderate pace that welcomes new players and depths of difficulty to satisfy weathered veterans willing to put in extra work.

    Pirates offers a number of options for excitement here, most memorably the "Shinking Ship" challenges, where you strike an actual ship with your ball to sink it into the playfield! This also triggers the Kraken and Davy Jones multiball modes, for an extra satisfying conclusion to each battle with pirate rivals. The spinner plate in the upper left of the playfield is a rewarding shot, with enough lucky visits also triggering another multiball mode. The game is centered around a compass rose seen in the middle of the playfield, with each of the eight objectives displayed. Completion of all of these starts the wizard mode, the awesome Four Winds Multiball! Pirates was also the first Stern game to use an LED display instead of the traditional Dot Matrix. The result is a crisp, clear and bright screen, with some pretty great animations throughout.

    Quips from Jack Sparrow, well-crafted models, and an exciting multi-level playfield - there's a lot to treasure in this table, so collect your coins and set out for adventure in Pirates of the Caribbean!
  • S
  • Scared Stiff (Bally/Midway , 1996)
    If you’ve never played this old bat from designer Dennis Nordman, you’re missing out on one of the most stylish and humorous pinball experiences of all time. It’s just loaded with cheeky innuendo and geeky in-jokes about horror movies and pinball tables!
  • Simpsons Pinball Party, The (Stern , 2003)
    A seemingly endless string of memorable moments and characters make The Simpsons a perfect theme for this recent table from Stern. Mayor Quimby, Cletus the Slack-Jawed Yokel, Comic Book Guy, Professor Frink - you name ‘em, they’re here, and they brought pinball jokes!
  • Sopranos, The (Stern , 2005)
  • Spider-Man (Stern , 2007)
    Released in response to the recent trilogy of Spidey’s movies, this table pits the webslinger against his four most gruesome foes: The Green Goblin, Sandman, Dr. Octopus and Venom! Spider-Man is the pinnacle of modern, high-tech pinball. Both old schoolers and newcomers dig it for its deep gameplay with lots of modes and shots galore! Remember: “With great pinball, comes great replayability.”
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (Williams , 1993)
    Boldly go where no pinball player has gone before with the cast of this memorable TV series as your crew. Complete missions, battle the Borg, and explore The Final Frontier with an amazing 6-ball multiball. Make it so!
  • Star Wars (Data East , 1992)
    Star Wars had a strong video game presence early on in arcades thanks to Atari, but it took a little while for the franchise to really make an impact as a pinball experience. Two pins with very limited runs preceded this game - The Empire Strikes Back (1980, Hankin) and Star Wars (1987, Sonic) - but flipper fanatics didn't have a real opportunity to use the Force until Data East released their version of Star Wars in 1992.

    Equipped with a control lever instead of a traditional plunger, your first objective in the game is to take out a TIE fighter in the video-based skill shot. Hit the ramp to score big points, light S-T-A-R W-A-R-S and unlock awards. When you see the red light above The Force scoop, hit it to collect a Force Award. The Force Awards range from lighting other special shots to increasing your bonus to activating the Tri-Ball multiball! If you hit The Force scoop when it's not lit, your carelessness can be rewarded by a Dark Side shot (worth 25 million after 5 shots), complete with the ominous breathing of Darth Vader. Shoot the Death Star several times for another path to Tri-Ball, and don't forget about your control lever - after your 5th Death Star hit, you can push it down and press its fire button to lower the Death Star and buy yourself a quick opportunity to start Tri-Ball early with a carefully-placed shot. Veteran players know that the game's original code allowed you to conquer the table by simply hitting the center ramp over and over, but in December 2012, Chad Hendrickson released a comprehensive 20th Anniversary "fan edit" of the software. The 1.04 ruleset greatly enhances the game so you're encouraged to explore the many shots on the playfield, creating a more challenging and more rewarding experience for casual and experienced players alike. We made sure to install the upgrade on our table right away, because this is one Star Wars "special edition" that's actually an improvement!

    Covered in detailed comic-book style artwork featuring iconic characters and scenes, Star Wars backs up the visuals with high-quality music, sound effects and quotes. Especially impressive and unexpected are the detailed models of R2-D2 and the Death Star. R2 reacts to the action as if he was accompanying you on the Death Star run or a trip to Dagobah, even hopping up and down if you achieve something truly awesome, like scoring a replay. If you think this pinball table is just a bucket of bolts, think again - after just one game, you'll be rushing to return to the change machine in less than 12 parsecs!
  • Star Wars Episode 1 (Williams , 1999)
    Special in many ways, Star Wars Episode I was the last pinball table produced by the legendary Williams company. It is also of course, one of two “Pinball 2000” tables, the other being the Attack From Mars spiritual sequel, Revenge from Mars. Pinball 2000 features a tinted playfield glass that reflects a monitor hanging in the backglass, creating the illusion of sprite-based graphics on the playfield for a hybrid between video games and pinball. Generally regarded at the better of the two Pinball 2000 titles, Episode I makes good use of its unique design and instantly recognizable license.

    Episode I was designed by John Popadiuk, the master behind Cirquis Voltaire and Theatre of Magic. The main goal in the game is to advance as a Jedi, starting as a Youth and ending up as an all-powerful Jedi Sprit. Along the way there are tons of fun and interesting modes that all fully utilize the monitor, creating a dynamic experience that would be difficult if not impossible in traditional pinball. Jar Jar and Anakin are ever-present here, much to the chagrin of the pickier fans, but fortunately the awesomely creepy Darth Maul and the "Duel of the Fates" score feature prominently as well!

    The game's modes range from serious space battles to the undeniably goofy "Jar Jar Juggling", taking you through a fairly accurate representation of the film's attempts at pleasing hardcore Star Wars fans and young Padawans not yet trained in the ways of the Force. The key multiball mode is a lightsaber duel between the Jedi Knight Qui-Gon Jinn and Darth Maul. Simply participating in this special mode will advance your rank, but if you manage to defeat Darth Maul, you'll earn 5 million points each time! Some of the game's thirteen modes also offer "Perfect Shooting" bonuses as an alternative challenge to simply completing the conditions. Once you've beaten all thirteen, the modes unlock again with double the bonuses.

    Say what you will about the Episode I film, the pinball adaptation ended up a memorable experience with a lot to do and see. Of course, credit must be given to its excellent design and ambitious technical achievements, which sadly did not lead to enough success to keep Williams afloat. Since you don't have to shift your attention between the playfield and a traditional score display, some may find this an easier introduction to the world of pinball. Amateurs, kids, pros and dedicated Star Wars fans can all find something to like in this game that seems flashy at first, but reveals a lot of depth!
  • T
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (Williams , 1991)
    Focused, fast, and relentless like its namesake, this early '90s pin keeps things moving with an open playfield and simple layout. Fast, full-playfield loops and turnarounds send the ball directly back to the flippers for continuous action. “Ah'll be back.”
  • The Walking Dead (Stern , 2014)
    The TV series successfully adapted the hit comic series and now Stern’s taken the zombie-killing chaos to the pinball world. Sights and sounds from the show add to the ambience, and the playfield has artwork packed with plenty of references for fans of The Walking Dead. The show’s special FX makeup designer Greg Nicotero even designed the disgustingly detailed zombie toys! Plunge into the post-apocalyptic world, and get ready to do battle. Shoot drop targets to collect supplies and do it again to activate Blood Bath, where every shot is worth 5,000 points. Enter the tunnel past the pop bumpers and earn more and more points with each successive shot, while you’ve got time. Bash the Well Walker to start Well Walker multiball. Looping left and right ramps keep your ball moving quickly through the back of the table, but stay vigilant, as you can kill extra walkers each time a crosshair target is lit. The prison building might offer temporary sanctuary, but not before you clean it out! During prison multiball, hit the “Stab” standing targets to collect kills and increase the kill multiplier, and keep hitting and relighting jackpots to light the Super Jackpot! Hardcore pinball fans will also appreciate a throwback feature rarely seen: Rollover star targets with an updated design. This game’s got fast and fun gameplay that offers some cool twists on classic ideas.
  • Theatre of Magic (Bally , 1995)
    "Stupendous displays of spellbinding power" are to be expected when you enter this game's world of illusion, where the impossible becomes reality. Watch the ball levitate, disappear, and suddenly reverse direction due to amazing unseen forces. Hit the Magic Trunk to perform tricks of your own, such as escaping from a strait jacket or safe, or juggle three balls during the many multiball modes.
  • Twilight Zone (Williams , 1993)
    You are about to enter another dimension: A dimension of space. A dimension of time. A dimension of mindblowingly awesome pinball. That’s right, the legendary Twilight Zone pinball machine exists in your dimension at Ground Kontrol! For pinball fans, Twilight Zone needs no introduction. For the uninitiated, here’s a quick run-down of just a few of its innovative and unique features:
    • A functioning “gumball” machine that vends pinballs across the table;
    • A clock that tracks your progress into the Twilight Zone;
    • An invisible “Power” you must battle using only your wits and the laws of physics; and, most infamously:
    • The “Power Ball,” a lightweight and lightning-fast mutant pinball that randomly appears on the playfield.
  • W
  • White Water (Williams , 1993)
    With its refreshing rafting theme, hilarious gags and addictive rule set, White Water is a sought after table that demands serious skills and a sense of humor! The river rapids setting makes for an adventurous take on a round of pinball, and the ever-present Bigfoot is your lighthearted nemesis that just wants to cool off. Wet Willie, the game's star and tour guide, provides a lot of character as he encourages the player to “keep going, partner!” Master designer Dennis Nordman, the great who brought us classics like Dr. Dude, Party Zone and both Elvira tables, struck gold with this highly original, fast-paced fan-favorite.

    To progress to the ultimate goal of the Vacation Jackpot, the player must advance a raft through the rough river by completing a series of wacky adventure modes. These include the Whirlpool, complete with an actual spiraling drain in which the pinball spins down the drain. In "Bigfoot Hot Foot", you'll torment Bigfoot, who looms over the playfield as an impressive moving toy. Activate this mode by completing the "hot foot" targets above the right flipper, and you'll be treated to an animation of Bigfoot getting a rude awakening from a sadistic and sneaky prank. Once he's distracted, shoot Bigfoot Bluff in the upper playfield to enter his cave and swipe his treasures for big points! The main multiball is deceptively easy to start, and fun to shoot for, with its targets right next to the lock shot in the middle of the playfield. An upper playfield with one extra flipper allows for the Insanity Falls and Whirlpool skill shots, and combination of shooting the upper playfield and sending your ball careening back down the rise and fall of the left inlane ramp with a carefully-placed upper-right flipper shot never seems to get old!

    Colorful artwork and an easy to understand (but tough to conquer) ruleset makes White Water a shining example of the balance between playability and presentation that the best Bally/Williams games offer. Drop in and go overboard with Wet Willie!
  • Wizard of Oz (Jersey Jack Pinball , 2013)
    For twelve years in a period of declining interest in pinball, the only company to make new machines was the venerable Stern. While most pinheads will agree that Stern struck gold a few times during this time, some of their efforts were less than inspiring, and the wish for some variety in the marketplace was a common one. Then, as something of a surprise to everyone, a completely independent production company entered the scene with a brand new table and a classic license: Jersey Jack Pinball with their Wizard of Oz table!

    Wizard of Oz boasts some serious innovation, and is certainly equipped to be a modern table for a new generation. Most obviously, a good portion of the backglass is a big, colorful LCD screen that takes on the duties of the Dot Matrix Displays from older tables. This big screen displays scores, indicates mode objectives, and treats the player to a surprising variety of clips from the 1939 classic film. The playfield is fully equipped with a stunning array of LED lighting, which provides an eye-popping array of color and illumination to the busy field. And, in a unique arrangement, Wizard of Oz has two separate upper playfields to go along with the several toys and decorations taken straight from the film’s robust world.

    The ruleset is deep and robust, with a total of five flippers on the field. There is a mode which reverses the flipper button arrangement, so the right button operates the left flippers, and vice versa. Hidden magnets abound in the game, providing some quirky variety and challenge to ball control.

    With so much to see and do in this brand new pinball experience, each game played feels different from the last. Not only did Jersey Jack enter the pinball market head-on, but they did so with a bold, elaborate table that one can only hope will continue into a new era of pinball manufacturers and innovators!